Are pomegranates a fountain of youth?

Mitochondria - tiny 'battery packs' that power our cells - run down with age
But eating pomegranates was found to power them up again
Chemicals in pomegranates are turned into a compound called urolithin A
This helps body recycle recharge cells and therefore keep ageing at bay

The humble pomegranate may old the secret to a long and healthy life.

Scientists say the Middle Eastern fruit contains a miracle ingredient that strengthens ageing muscles and extends life.

With experiments in worms and mice producing results that are nothing sort of amazing, they are now testing the fountain of youth supplement on people.

Even something as simple as keeping muscles young could reduce the number of falls among the elderly and increase independence, allowing people to live in their own homes for longer.

The Swiss scientists said: We believe this research is a milestone in anti-ageing efforts. 

Their excitement centres on the pomegranates ability to keep mitochondria, the tiny 'battery packs' that power our cells, charged up.


Normally, mitochondria run down with age, making them less effective or even toxic and, it is thought, leading to muscle weakening and frailty.

However, chemicals in pomegranates are turned into a compound called urolithin A by the bugs that live in the gut.

The urolithin A then helps the body recycle these drained battery packs, recharging cells and holding ageing at bay.

In one experiment, worms given urolithin A lived almost 50 per cent longer.